August192014
  • Me: Hey, so I was here for ten hours yesterday. Should I do overtime or take off early?
  • Boss: Eh, whichever you feel is best.
  • And then there was a Two and a half hour meeting with Boss, Boss's Boss, and Finance.
  • Boss: So. Uh. You're doing overtime!
8PM

wtfcomicsclub:

We are the WTF Comics Club, and we are Captain Marvel!

The first meeting was a smash. Looking forward to next month, when we’ll be talking about Greg Rucka’s Batwoman: Elegy and eating delicious donuts.

See you there!

This was a lot of fun!  September is crazy busy for me, but if I’m in town, I’m totally up for Batwoman and donuts.

(I was the one knitting in the corner)

7PM

Let’s play a game!

foxberryblue:

Stand where you are, look around, and list whatever liquidy thing is closest to you. This is now your fanfic lube.

(via barkpretty)

3PM
nellysketchesnstuff:

reistrider:

campdracula5eva:

bebinn:

rhrealitycheck:

Scarlet Letters: Getting the History of Abortion and Contraception Right 

Abortion was not just legal—it was a safe, condoned, and practiced procedure in colonial America and common enough to appear in the legal and medical records of the period. Official abortion laws did not appear on the books in the United States until 1821, and abortion before quickening did not become illegal until the 1860s. If a woman living in New England in the 17th or 18th centuries wanted an abortion, no legal, social, or religious force would have stopped her.


Reminder that records of contraception and abortion exist all the way back to 1550 BCE in ancient Egypt!
This was a really fascinating read. Until the early 19th century, abortion was legal until “quickening,” or when the pregnant person first felt the baby kick - anywhere from 14 to 26 weeks into the pregnancy. Society only began to condemn it when people decided white, middle- to upperclass women weren’t having enough children soon enough in their lives, and when male doctors started taking over traditionally female health care fields, like midwifery.
Yep, shockingly enough, it’s never, ever been about the life of the fetus - only about misogyny, racism, and classism (ableism, too, though the article doesn’t discuss it).

The bolded is hella important.

From the first article: “Increased female independence was also perceived as a threat to male power and patriarchy, especially as Victorian women increasingly volunteered outside the home for religious and charitable causes.”

While there are many pro-lifers who care about the baby/fetus, their movement’s practices gravely harm women in need of contraception, abortions, and other reproductive care.

nellysketchesnstuff:

reistrider:

campdracula5eva:

bebinn:

rhrealitycheck:

Scarlet Letters: Getting the History of Abortion and Contraception Right

Abortion was not just legal—it was a safe, condoned, and practiced procedure in colonial America and common enough to appear in the legal and medical records of the period. Official abortion laws did not appear on the books in the United States until 1821, and abortion before quickening did not become illegal until the 1860s. If a woman living in New England in the 17th or 18th centuries wanted an abortion, no legal, social, or religious force would have stopped her.

Reminder that records of contraception and abortion exist all the way back to 1550 BCE in ancient Egypt!

This was a really fascinating read. Until the early 19th century, abortion was legal until “quickening,” or when the pregnant person first felt the baby kick - anywhere from 14 to 26 weeks into the pregnancy. Society only began to condemn it when people decided white, middle- to upperclass women weren’t having enough children soon enough in their lives, and when male doctors started taking over traditionally female health care fields, like midwifery.

Yep, shockingly enough, it’s never, ever been about the life of the fetus - only about misogyny, racism, and classism (ableism, too, though the article doesn’t discuss it).

The bolded is hella important.

From the first article: “Increased female independence was also perceived as a threat to male power and patriarchy, especially as Victorian women increasingly volunteered outside the home for religious and charitable causes.”

While there are many pro-lifers who care about the baby/fetus, their movement’s practices gravely harm women in need of contraception, abortions, and other reproductive care.

(via meghantopus)

2PM
1PM

ice-is-also-great:

babybutta:

rosalarian:

magnoliapearl:

madeleineishere:

Here is a comic!

ITS A GOOD COMIC <3

I think about my soul escaping whenever I create something.

This made dying a little easier.

I was sort of on this train of thought when my friend passed away last summer, but this comic explains it better than I ever could.

(via charmingpplincardigans)

art 

11AM

I’m still reconciling today’s language and its advancements. For example, in my era, a ‘toilet’ was a ‘vanity cabinet’, ‘Intercourse’ meant simply ‘social conversation’, ‘awful’ meant ‘awe-inspiring’

(Source: gracecrane, via amonitrate)

10AM

sweetestdrain:

Frontier (Snowpiercer — gen.) — Know your place.  (Vid post and download link at DW and AO3. Premiered at VividCon 2014.)

(via vividconofficial)

August182014

Uh.

Did everyone’s embedded youtube videos start autoplaying on tumblr or is it just me?

8PM
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